Last April, I was a guest faculty member at the Pikes Peak Writers Conference, an outstanding writers’ colloquium

As a U.S. citizen, it’s your job to know your rights so you can exercise them

presented annually in beautiful Colorado Springs, Colorado.  This area has been one of the areas worst hit in Colorado by forest fires because of the many thousands of acres of beautiful pine that encircle Colorado Springs.  My thoughts are with the people there.

Today I’m sharing a few slides from one of my presentations that offered a high-level definition of “expectation of privacy.”  Most people don’t value their expectation of privacy until a government agent (such as police, property inspectors, health inspectors) intrudes onto their property without authorization.  Another area in which people don’t always value their expectation of privacy is in their personal computers. The founding fathers wanted people to be secure in their “homes and papers,” but no one has ever doubted that the Fourth Amendment expectation of privacy applies to individuals’ personal computers and other electronic devices.

What is expectation of privacy in a nutshell?  It’s a zone of protection created by constitutional law against unreasonable searches and searches.

In a future blog, we’ll discuss this in more depth.  Meanwhile, the below slides offer an introduction to this topic:

Expectation of Privacy:  A belief in the existence of freedom from unwanted especially governmental intrusion in some thing or place

 

An Example of a PI and Expectation of Privacy

 

Skip Traces Conducted on Criminals on Behalf of Courts/Law Enforcement: No Expectations of Privacy

Denver criminal defense attorney Shaun Kaufman is strongly committed to protecting individual rights against government intrusion of all kinds.  Contact Shaun Kaufman Law by completing the contact form on the right of this page or by calling 303-309-0430.

Shaun Kaufman: Compassionate Lawyer, Tough Litigator